Author Archive

March 27, 2012

The Real World

by SarahRook

Apologies for disappearing for months! Here is my current dilemma, in all its glory.

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January 21, 2012

Of cats and cows and wolf sharks

by SarahRook

With all the learning-to-read posts, I couldn’t help but throw my two cents in, too.

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January 8, 2012

(Constructive) Criticism

by SarahRook

Coming out of Swat, I really do feel like I know how to take criticism – most of the time, at least.  At Swarthmore, the kind of criticism I got kind of depended on what I was doing. If I was working up to my elbows in clay, and had just finished something that I wasn’t sure about, the critiques I got tended to be focused on pushing my work farther, higher, deeper, wider, bigger.  If I was scratching out an answer in an Engineering problem set for the eighth time, the criticism tended to be a shove in the right direction – look at page 142, you’re going to need that equation.  No, that’s not right, figure out the tension again, go from there.  If I was writing an education paper, critique came from needing more sources, explaining a point more clearly, tying together what I was doing, digging deeper into the why and the how.  Criticism in the real world, in my real world.  Well.

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November 24, 2011

Happy Thanksgiving!

by SarahRook

So I wanted to wish you all a Happy Thanksgiving, but I also wanted to talk a little bit about holidays and how I find myself teaching them.

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November 7, 2011

The Joys of Naptime

by SarahRook

Nap time. The words have such an implication:  children, asleep, quiet and calm.

Does it actually work out like that?  Not so much.  I am teaching little ones – the threes, the fours, and the fives.  I know that we learned about child development in Intro Ed, in Dev Psych, in various bits and pieces in other education and psychology classes.  What those classes didn’t quite prepare me for was the huge gap in developmental levels, just in these two years.  When I put up my birthday board, I lined it up by age so that I could see where my children actually were.  I was amazed at the variety:  I had young threes and old fives and everything in between. 

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